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The Way To Interview A Roof Specialist Correctly

Previously posted at Los Angeles Business 2.

To help make the proper choices regarding placing a roof on your own home, you want to be aware of knowledge related to this process. Continue reading to enable you to learn necessary information pertaining to getting what you require away from a fresh roof. You don’t want to end up feeling empty-handed.

Exactly like most projects, roofing requires you to possess a clean surface to function on. The sheathing also has to be perfectly flat, so if you see any warping, replace it. Lastly, every last nail must be removed to guarantee it doesn’t impact the new roof once installed, causing problems.

If you want to walk on the roof, it is vital that one does it at the same time when it is not very cold or hot. Extreme weather is likely to make shingles very brittle, so walking upon them during this time period may cause plenty of damage. Morning is the perfect time during summer months, and afternoon is better in the winter.

Do not ask your roofer to work on your gutters. This is simply not their area of expertise and they are generally likely to mess up. Therefore, simply give attention to getting them do the roof, and when your gutters have to be replaced because of this, find someone to do that job that focuses on it.

It’s quite difficult to choose between roofing contractors, but seeking a list of references can be quite a huge help. Any company which refuses to provide this kind of list is not the one which you would like to hire. Don’t just demand this list, though, be sure to call some people upon it to double check their experiences.

When you should leave heavy-duty work up to professionals, there’s lots of preventative maintenance you can do to keep your roof in a fit condition. Keep an eye out for shingles that should be repaired or replaced, and make sure your flashing and underlining have been in good condition. After some effort, it is possible to avoid big repair jobs altogether.

Researching roofing doesn’t must be hard! As a result of this short article, now you have a big selection of advice that can be used that you need. Be sure to keep these guidelines in mind any time you have got a roof related problem. It will assist you a good deal.


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York University Students to Interview ‘Pursue Impossible’ 3D Artists for Assignment

Previously posted at The University of Western Australia (UWA) in Second Life.

YORK UNI STUDENTS ALL READY FOR THE CHALLENGE
A GROUP PHOTO OF THE YORK UNI STUDENTS @ THE UWA CHALLENGE GALLERY

Students fromYork University in Canada will be examining the artworks at the UWA Gallery entered for the Pursue Impossible challenges and selecting artists to interview for the creation of Artists profiles, under the tutelage of Dr Carolyn Steele for the 2nd year Culture and Expression/Humanities Course in a uni titled:  Art and Artists in 3D Multiuser Environments

So if you have an artwork in… you could be approached by a pair of students. Each pair of students needs to profile 1 artist, and all pairs have to select different artists. You only need take part if you are willing.Its perfectly ok to decline if you don’t feel up to it.

This assignment accounts of 10% of their unit they are undertaking this semester. The ‘rubric’ for the unit, or what the students have been asked to do, is as follows (provided by York University):

Rubric: 3D Media Artist Profile 
The University of Western Australia’s annual 3D Open Art Challenge provides a unique opportunity to experience some of the most accomplished art of this kind in the world all in one place. It also provides an excellent opportunity to talk with artists about their motivations, processes and visions for their own work and for this media.
This assignment requires you to select an artist whose work has been included in this year’s art challenge and write a 750-word profile about them, including screen captures of their work. You can find some information about these artists online – many have their own websites, but in most cases, you will be writing about artists about whom not much has been written. Their submission to the art challenge will usually include an artist statement, along with a little information about the artist. You are strongly encouraged to contact the artist directly through IM in Second Life and arrange an interview. Keep in mind, these artists will be located all over the world, in different time zones, and may not be fluent English speakers. You may need to try to contact two or three artists before you find one who will be comfortable being interviewed, so schedule in time for that. We will discuss how to do this in class.
I will be looking for the following elements in my grading of your profiles:
·      Coverage of important details including – name (SL/RL – IF they are willing to share), biographical information – where they live, occupation, training/education etc, name, précis and photo of their submission.
·      Insight into the artist including – intent, process, challenges, their background as a 3D artist.
·      Your analysis of how this piece/artist relates to key course concepts.

·      Your personal reaction to and/or experience of this piece, including your motivation for selecting it.


Visit http://uwainsl.blogspot.com/2015/10/york-university-students-to-interview.html for original post date.

An interview with Artistide Despres

Previously posted at Bryn Oh.


An interview with Artistide Despres

Artistide Despres
Bryn Oh: Where are you from? And who are the most renowned (not necessarily the best) artists from your country in your opinion?


Artistide Despres:  I was born in Normandy, France. The most renowned artists… difficult question as there are so many of them. Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Auguste Rodin, Francis Picabia, Yves Klein and even Serge Gainsbourg to
Francis Picabia

draw a diagonal line through time and disciplines. I’m not even sure my mum knows Picabia. I could have added a lot of impressionists, and listed the ‘Musée d’Orsay’ artists.


Auguste Rodin
I’ve undoubtedly forgotten so many people, some are not really French by the way, like the film director Jean-Luc Godard who is French-Swiss and the photographer Brassaï who was a Hungarian. Once upon a time, France was an attractive place for artists.




Bryn Oh:  Often the average person outside SL is perplexed with virtual worlds in general. When people unfamiliar with the virtual ask you what you do how do you explain it?

Artistide Despres:  This is true, many people are unfamiliar with virtual worlds. Maybe I would say: Imagine you’re living in Italy and you would like to meet a good friend from Japan
Yves Klein

in the MoMA in New York. This will require some organisation. After an evaluation of the costs, maybe you will renounce the project.  Now, imagine that a good representation of yourself and of your friend (avatars) meet in a space that is a good representation of the MoMA. That you could walk together, chat and share the same feelings about this (virtual) environment. If you have felt this illusion you have successfully entered or used a virtual world.



Bryn Oh:  Who are a few of your favourite artists and why?

Artistide Despres:  I will give you 500 names… Any discipline?

Let me try per century then:

– XXIst – Too many. All those 15 minutes of fame. No, we have just entered the XXIst
Robert Frank

century, haven’t we? My students in a few years :)


– XXth – Marcel Duchamp because of his clear and intelligent discourse on art, especially the interviews he gave in the 60s. I like the way he splits art in ‘retinal’ and ‘non-retinal’. Jean Cocteau because he was such a ‘touche-à-tout’. Pier Paolo Pasolinias a poet, writer, film director and politician. Many photographers: Robert Frank, Bill Brandt (such nice persons).


– XIXth – Paul Cézanne, because you can feel the cubism coming alive in his work, especially in “La Montagne Sainte-Victoire”. Gustave Moreau because he fits so well in this century. Sculptor François
Paul Cézanne

Pompon, but I don’t know why I like his work.


– XVIIIth – Goya of course, he was so modern for his period. Do you know any more artists of the XVIIIth century?


Or did you mean in SL?

AuraKyo Insoo because her work comes from the heart. We miss her a lot. I hope she is safe.

Rrose Selavy because I have always been jealous of this artist’s realisations (that’s a good sign, isn’t it?)

Bryn Oh for showing us the perfect storytelling in SL.


Bryn Oh:  Whose artwork do you personally dislike the most and why?


AuraKyo Insoo
Artistide Despres:  Well the artwork I dislike I generally cannot remember, I annihilate them from my memory! In RL I truly hate Salvador Dalí’s work, but more because of his personality.

In SL? Well, bullies don’t produce art in SL, they are too busy, luckily.


Bryn Oh:  Which of your own works are you most proud of? Do you feel any failed and if so do you now know why?

Artistide Despres:  My RL work is mainly photographic. Twenty years ago I made a series of pinhole exposures, traditionally printed on water-colour paper as kallitypes; they are still my favourite creations.  In SL I like some of my music instruments the most. Especially ‘Etude sur Olivier Messiaen’, maybe because it still astonishes me whenever I watch it. I will certainly miss that one the day SL stops working. My work relays on Havok®
Goya

(proprietary physics simulation software) because I always use physical objects and complex scripting. Unfortunately I am not able to transfer my creations onto another virtual world, not even on a local server. It will not work.



Petite Etude sur Olivier Messiaen:


Bryn Oh:  Do you have a method when creating? If so how does it often progress?

For example do you sketch or write out ideas first for weeks or do you perhaps just jump directly into the project with little planning and adapt as you go?

Artistide Despres:  Generally I have an idea that comes up and I know how I have to handle it. Some work involves a lot of research. The ‘Fukushima’ installation needed some realtime data of the amount of radioactivity. Finding a good feed was quite hard.

The tuning always takes a long time. In SL some factors are unpredictable, like the quality of the server you have been assigned or new implementations that can slow down processes you were used to. For my photographic work it is quite the same, I spend a lot of time selecting and refining.


Alea Fukushima:


Bryn Oh:  What are you currently reading, listening to or looking at to inspire your work?

Artistide Despres:  Actually I give more priority to my photographic work. My direct source of inspiration is the world around me. I teach in an art school (it is wonderful to work with master’s and bachelor students) which gives me very few time to read, except during the holidays. Pier Paolo Pasolini “Contre la télévision” was the last book I read. And I enjoyed the fiction-documentary ‘Sunless’ by Chris Marker(1983), which I related to a RL project I am still working on.


Bryn Oh:  Does your work have an overall theme and if so what might that be? If not please describe how you tend to pick your topics.

Artistide Despres:  I feel concerned politically by topics like ‘war’, ’tolerance’ and ‘endangered nature’.  For example my ‘Fukushima’ installation or ‘Where I found my Ivory Tower surrounded by a Huxleyan World, which turned out to be an Orwellian World’ project.  In fact I have always had social or political themes.



Where I found my Ivory Tower surrounded by a Huxleyan world, which turned out to be an Orwellian world:


Bryn Oh:  Have you ever had to deal with negative publicity or a disappointing rejection of your artwork? How do you deal with it?

Artistide Despres:  In SL it is ‘take it or leave it’ because it is not easy to evaluate a project. The public is generally not very difficult, in terms of quality and content. I would be rather glad with an utter rejection, because that means it’s a ‘true’ reaction. It happened to me when I presented my installation ‘Les Petits Soldats’. It was an anti-militarist artwork where notions like ‘honour’ and ‘patriotism’ were heavily discussed. It resulted in verbal fights and a lot of commotion. We need more instances like that one.


Les Petits Soldats:


Bryn Oh:  Would you like to take a stab at explaining what defines virtual art?

Artistide Despres:  I am not a philosopher, nor a good writer, so I may need to refer to Gary Zabel’s thesis about virtual art.  Film and books are immersive but they don’t
Artistide Despres Image by (I think)

constitute virtual art.  A game or a good website is interactivebut they are far from being virtual art.  A 3D representation is impressive but I cannot live inside it unless I am virtual too.  What about combining all these factors and meeting other creative persons virtually?



Bryn Oh:  What would you say makes virtual creations unique over other art forms?

Artistide Despres:  The mixture of immersion, interaction, the feeling of space, the possibility to work through the network with other persons (avatars) is certainly unique and constitutes a new art form. I almost forgot about coding and writing script, which is an important procedure when you are working with virtual arts.  When scripting will resemble poetry we will probably have the ultimate form of virtual art. (When the difficult task of scripting won’t be a technical challenge anymore.)



Bryn Oh:  Centuries ago there was no such thing as an “artist” just craftsmen, as time progressed superior technical ability and creativity created the elite “Master” artist whose work stood recognized above all others. In 1917 Marcel Duchamp submitted a work entitled “Fountain” to the Society of Independent artists. He stated “… He (the artist) CHOSE it. He took an article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title
Marcel Duchamp

and point of view – created a new thought for that object” He wanted to shift the focus away from technical craft to more of an aesthetic intellectual interpretation. Some say that because of him almost everything is considered art today. From an elephant painting with its trunk, a Banksy, a child’s drawing to someone vomiting paint onto a canvas. What is your perspective on this?

Artistide Despres:  I would like to think that art is the ‘thermometer’ of human intelligence. Therefore ANY painting made by an elephant is NOT art.  Duchamp’s Fountain was a big statement on art. The object was eventually lost and destroyed (The actual object is a remake). It is stupid to think that because of him almost everything is considered art today. Duchamp was far more selective. Art must be linked to the context of its creation (Why? When? How? For Whom?). Duchamp’s set came at the right time: the concept became more important than the representation.  Sometimes, random circumstances or specific persons improve the quality of art : The invention of Photography and Film, Cubism & Dada, Dodecaphonism, and Sound synthesis have been huge steps for art. Virtual Art might be such a step as well.


Visit http://brynoh.blogspot.com/2015/08/an-interview-with-artistide-despres.html for original post date.

An interview with Giovanna Cerise

Previously posted at Bryn Oh.


      Giovanna Cerise

Bryn Oh: Where are you from?  And who are the most renowned (not necessarily the best)  artists from your country in your opinion?
Giovanna Cerise:     I live in Italy, and currently I teach Italian and Latin Literature in a high school. I have joined to my liberal arts studies, the musical studies by studying classical guitar and  musical  Paleography. So for a long time music has been my main activity. My passion for virtual art has filled the emptiness left in me from having abandoned it.  Making a choice of famous artists in the world is very difficult, in a country like Italy, where you breathe art in every corner: those who have left an important, indelible trace are so many. So it is an impossible task for me to choose the names. I will indicate randomly the ones that come immediately to my mind, forgetting certainly many. Dante Alighieri, Luigi Pirandello, Dario Fo, Eugenio Montale, Umberto Eco, Umberto Boccioni, Michelangelo, Leonardo Da Vinci, Amedeo Modigliani and again Giacomo Puccini, Giuseppe Verdi, Edoardo De Filippo, Luciano Pavarotti, Federico Fellini, Roberto Rossellini, Paul Sorrentino but Marcello Mastroianni, Anna Magnani, Monica Vitti … and I could go on forever.
Bryn Oh:  Often the average person outside SL  is perplexed with virtual worlds in general.  When people unfamiliar with the virtual ask you what you do how do you explain it?
Arythmos
Giovanna Cerise:     I confess that until recently I had problems speaking about my experience in SL, first because I myself found difficult, in defining it. When I tried to explain that I was taking a course in virtual didatics, around me I saw quizzical expressions, mainly because others did not understand what a virtual world had in common with the work I was doing. With time the situation has not improved much. Now, to those who ask me questions, I present my experience by  trying to show them all the possibilities that it have opened to me and how it has enriched me.
Bryn Oh:  Who are a few of your favorite artists and why?
Frida Kahlo
Giovanna Cerise:  Many of the artists that I have already named are among my favorites. In general I am attracted to artists who are able to express their innovative point of view, those who dig deep and have the courage to show their more hidden world. . . The works of these artists are “listening” and they seek to connect our inner with the piece of the world that we have in front.  I love Frida Kahlo and her intense works, full of strength, sensitivity, passion. I like the large metal sculptures of Arnoldo Pomodoro, his perfectly geometric forms with a highly polished surface, torn with cracks and openings that expose a shaggy interior, fraught with reliefs. And yet Anish Kapoor and his
Anish Kapoor

monumental, surprising, disturbing and problematic installations. Alberto Burri and Lucio Fontana, who question the system of values ​​and certainties and invite you to investigate further. And then of course there are the musicians, and I name Bach among all of them, an exceptional personality, whos work is both poetry and science t. To these other should be added like Hermann Hesse, Luigi Pirandello, Italo Svevo and Eugenio Montale. Many, then, are the artists of virtual worlds by whom even if for different reasons I am affected. I want to mention some of the works: “der Schauer” of Selavy Oh, Transition Zone of Oberon Onmura, Imogen and Pigeon of Bryn Oh, “Taxy! To the Zircus ” of Eupalinos Ugajin, Black and White World of Cica Ghost, The Inevitable of Fate of Rose Borchovski, Sparkys of Romy Nayar, Celebrity Blow Your Tits Off Rides Again of Maya Paris , Imago Anatopism of Alpha Auer, Bogon Flux of Blotto Epsilon and Cutea Benelli …

Bryn Oh:  Whose artwork do you personally dislike the most and why?
Arithmos
Giovanna Cerise:  More than indicating precise names, I am not normally attracted to those works that, as we say in Italy, are “Tutto fumo e niente arrosto,” works in which the author only seeks the spectacular effect, trying to cover the complete absence of any content, in the worst cases, and, at best, give a vague idea of a general concept where they trivially put in anything that has to do with it at  the moment. I feel a mental laziness inability to empathetically envolve the observer in an authentic manner, touching only the emotional surface l with a cluster or a juxtaposition of elements that should inspire wonder, but, at the end they just get bored, for their repetition, which at the end to nothing more than to slip epidermically.
Bryn Oh:  Which of your own works are you most proud of?  Do you feel any failed and if so do you now know why?
Kaos, Kosmos
Giovanna Cerise:  Among the works that I like most there are those of the last period and I refer to the  installations as Arithmos, Fisicofollia, Cosmos and kaos and Speculum. I am particularly tied to the “Habanera” inspired by Bizet’s Carmen and to smaller works like “Broken Time” and “The hidden purity”. Usually I am never happy with the work I have just finished. My first temptation is to destroy them immediately. Luckily I can resist. I’m pretty critical of what I do and often, then reviewing some works in the past which seemed “exceptional” at that time, I say myself “But it is really bad”, especially when I detect a sweetning or winking effect.
Bryn Oh:  Do you have a method when creating? If so how does it often progress?  For example do you sketch or write out ideas first for weeks or do you perhaps just jump directly into the project with little planning and adapt as you go?
Overlaps
Giovanna Cerise:  For a long time I felt the need, which then became a habit, to write down in a notebook those  words, phrases, images, musical references that have impressed me in a positive or negative way. The book has become a treasure chest of sensations and concepts, almost inexhaustible. It becomes a kind of latent memory from which often unconsciously, and for various reasons, an idea emerges. Sometimes the idea is so clear that it is immediately transformed into an image and the work of creation becomes fast and immediate. Other times I let  an idea subside for a long time, which expands like a spider web. Often I proceed through a symbolic research. And when I arrive to what I think is the best, I start to remove the superfluous, the repetitions, the distortions, trying to synthesize the whole. In practice can be summarized in a job of expansion and synthesis, which  I can be repeated several times, and that is accompanied by mental images of the transposition of ideas. The work of concretization is never very long, but it is intense. I try to concentrate it when I know I’m free from other tasks, because it absorbs all my energy becoming almost compulsive. In a few days what I had done before on a mental level is repeated. I collect objects, I work with prim or Blender. I empty the inventory looking for something that maybe I built some time before. I create texture. I move, I change, I look from various angles and, above all, I experiment, until I am convinced, until I arrive to the version that will be visible, but I may not be definite.
Bryn Oh:  What are you currently reading, listening to or looking at to inspire your work?
Speculum
Giovanna Cerise:  Right now I’m reading “The birth of the  Greek tragedy” by Friedrich Nietzscke. In addition to Bach, who, as I said, is my favourite author, I’m listening to “Tristan and Isolde” by Richard Wagner and some songs of Queen.
Bryn Oh:  Does your work have an overall theme and if so what might that be?  If not please describe how you tend to pick your topics.
 
Giovanna Cerise:  There is not a general theme that inspires me, but, almost all my works I thing you can find a tension that reveal the relationship between unity and duality, which then often becomes that of multiplicity. And of course, we can still include the randomness and determinism and the fragmentary. To these general concepts I add my fondness for music that becomes a source of inspiration, not only when I work on a musical work, but also for the disposition of space, whether symmetrical or asymmetrical, and for all that can be connected to rhythm or harmony (assonance, dissonances, repetitions, pauses, etc.). There is a theme that then I particularly feel  which concerns the violence, especially against women, and oppression in all its forms.
Bryn Oh:  Have you ever had to deal with negative publicity or a disappointing rejection of your artwork?  How do you deal with it?
The hidden purity
Giovanna Cerise:  Not many times, but sometimes, it has happened, that someone has criticized some of my choices about effects, believed as excessive, or some color, saying that it would be better if I had used another. Another time offering my work for an event I was asked to change it by inserting some textures that were supposed to make, from the point of view of the customer, my work closer to the event. I refused and I was invited to take away my job. How did I react? I continued to use excessive effects, when I thought it appropriate, to use the colors I wanted and withdrawing the work, excluding other possibilities of collaboration with those I had requested the work. This does not mean that I do not accept  criticism, It is natural and even necessary. It is useful not so much for the work already done, but when it makes  me think about what I will do after, words especially if it highlights  something that I had not considered before.
But it is also true that when the artist creates, he has the right and the duty to choose, accepting all the consequences of this choice.
Instead I don’t take in consideration that criticism that based on preconceptions that become rules to be respected at all costs and that become the parameters of the work itself.
Bryn Oh:  Would you like to take a stab at explaining what defines virtual art? 
The variations of the magic flute
Giovanna Cerise:  It’s difficult to give a definition, even if I can try and probably I will not dodge the stab. We can begin by saying that virtual art is one of the possible paths which an artist may choose to undertake in our time. Precisely for this reason, however, it can become a need or requirement because we are immersed in a society where technology development is due to changes in the way we think and act, to the transformation of each type of language and perception . It is a path that has in itself infinite potentialities that have become active only partially, and therefore it opens up a fervent scenario of not simple but difficult perspectives. It constantly uses the testing of new methods and techniques, sometimes incorporating the traditional ones and amplifying the combination of art and technology. It is not an easy path for many reasons, some reasons are certainly strong, due to the reluctance of the majority of people, who belong or don’t belong to the sector, towards this type of art, but also to the shallowness which unfortunately sometimes is found in those who do this kind of art, and which is manifested in various ways. (Perhaps the stab has come …)
Bryn Oh:  What would you say makes virtual creations unique over other art forms?
Fisicofollia, image by Kikas Babenco
Giovanna Cerise:  Even here it is difficult to give a clear answer. Many terms were used to define the virtual creations: immersivity, interactivity, interconnectedness, complexity, constant change of perspective, presence of more and different sides, break down barriers of all kinds, multimedia, ability to be replicated, and even the unfinished … Perhaps we can say that its uniqueness lies in the potential that the artist can use at the same time and in the same space all or many of these elements, pouring into this form of art all the features and problems of our age.
Bryn Oh:  Centuries ago there was no such thing as an “artist” just craftsmen, as time progressed superior technical ability and creativity created the elite “Master” artist whose work stood recognized above all others.  In 1917 Marcel Duchamp submitted a work entitled “Fountain” to the Society of Independent artists.    He stated “… He (the artist) CHOSE it. He took an article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object”  He wanted to shift the focus away from technical craft to more of an aesthetic intellectual interpretation.  Some say that because of him almost everything is considered art today.  From an elephant painting with its trunk, a Banksy, a child’s drawing to someone vomiting paint onto a canvas.  What is your perspective on this?
Marcel Duchamp
Giovanna Cerise:  The choice of Duchamp to use, without modification, of a profane object to bring out the cultural development of an object not depending on his artistic transformation, was certainly a source of discussion, poignant and often innovative, especially for the period when it was formulated. I think this placed the artist face to face with the choice, which often is not free because it is conditioned by external and internal factors, to take the path of Duchamp or the “traditional” one, with all the implications that this entails. In both cases, the choice itself can not be separated from the creative purpose that arises from the artist and his mental and conceptual processing. You can not, on the other hand, say that the technical skill is never important. Sometimes I think it is also essential. If we shift the focus from the visual arts to  music or dance, for example, I can not think (but maybe that’s my limit) of how you can do this kind of art if you do not have a certain technique and a certain knowledge. The artist, perhaps, then reaches higher goals when he most manages to hide his technique. (On the other hand I must say that the acquisition of techniques, experimenting new ones, at least for me, is also a source of pleasure, of game and a way to clear the mind and show better ideas).


Visit http://brynoh.blogspot.com/2015/12/an-interview-with-giovanna-cerise.html for original post date.

An Interview with Mr. WoodyRacer Emoto – A Virtual Landscaper

Previously posted at ….Fashionably Yours.

***Please note:  Special thanks to Ande Sugarplum who photographed Mr. Emoto’s fantastic work

1) What inspired you to become a landscaper?  

I had my own real life landscaping business for 17 years, Commercial and residential.

2) Can you please tell me a little bit about yourself?

 I am a well blessed Christian man, that believes that God had blessed me with gifts, one of many is creating here in Second Life (SL).

3) What was one of your greatest achievements?

Wow! I would have to say that every job that I do here is my greatest achievement, and also a couple of the people ( who will remain unnamed) that I taught about SL, have gone on to become very successful here financially.

4) What was one of your most difficult jobs?

 I would have to say though when I did my first full sim at 2000 meters (and you wouldn’t know that you were in the sky) was a great success.  I had never done one, and I just jumped into it, and it turned out amazing.  It was for the meeroos when they first came out.

5) How does one hire you for work and what are your rates? 

 The best way for anyone to hire me for work is to contact me by e-mail at [email protected]. As far as rates, I take each one as they come and interview the people who want the work. I  get a feel for what they want to see, feel, and then do my best to let them know the detail of what they want.
 
     I do have a 10 KL minimum now, and I take it from there, however the easier one is to work with the better rate they will receive. Yes, I do believe I have earned the ability to get paid for what I do here, however I don’t do drama.

6) Any future plans for your art or big projects?

 Well put it this way, I desire to create more here, and if I could keep busy year round I most likely would make this my full time job.  In the future, I would like to see SL develop even more into the best virtual world out there, creating more work for those with knowledge of this program.

7) Any advice for your fans are those looking to pursue art like yours?

  If I may make a comment that can be added, I do think that one of the problems here is many people here desire to have work done for next to nothing, and I want to be part of a group that shows that if you want something unique and like a dream come true, they must reward those doing the work properly. Linden Labs (LL) will never release how many private sims they support and with that said I know that there are over enough up and running to supply work for those who want to pursue the art of landscaping grids.  Your going to have to be really good and know all the rules of this world to be successful here.
   
    I became successful here my first year, however I brought 17 years of RL landscape experience to the grid and this was very beneficial.  Huge learning curve for this was tough for me and believe it or not I know very little about computers, but thanks to my wife Mozy Pera, she helped me through the first part of the learning curve.  Now she looks at my work as I create and it brings tears of joy to her eyes.  The majority of this world is based on visual stimulating ones sight.  I believe God has blessed me with the ability to create so others sight can be stimulated all the time anywhere they look with their camera or walk and one must be gifted to do this here.  One knows when he or she sees it, without a doubt.

Thank you so much for your time. It is an honor to be able to meet and interview you. And another special thanks to Mr. Иāę Wαтαŋαbę – яεηεε™  for the project. 


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The Live Interview with MISS VIRTUAL WORLD

Previously posted at Chasing Catalina.

Photographed by the sensational Tempest Rosca

MISS VIRTUAL WORLD

The Live Interview


So we were given a bit of a fun styling challenge for this and told……be comfy. *laughs* So at first I went and found this really fun dino hoodie that would have been crazy and fun and I’d have been laughing about the whole time. But then I thought about it….be comfy. What would I actually wear? So I tossed the dino hoodie back in my closet cuz yes, I totally plan on wearing it at some point, and created a look that I love. That is me. And that is comfy. I’m Alaskan, so going outside and out and about requires snow pants, boots, and a range of other outer wear. But when I’m inside and just relaxing, I tend to just be in a tank top and jeans or leggings. So voila…made a pixel version of the Alaskan me. Hair tossed in a bun, some tinted chapstick, one of my favorite necklaces, and off I went to the interview.

What were the questions? Well…that’d be telling, huh? :p

Though seriously, it was a fun experience. Not hard or bad at all. And it’s funny because I had no idea what the interview process entailed. So to actually land and blink out the grey and see was an adventure in and of itself. But the questions were fun to answer and the entire process didn’t take long. At all. Is that a good thing? A bad thing? Who knows? I guess we’ll find out in a couple lot weeks. *laughs*



S T Y L E C A R D

miss chelsea. | Nina Zip Leggings Maitreya Chocolate
Addams | Thelma Wool Cardigan w/ Turtleneck // S
Blueberry | Tank Top

Just Design | UGZ Ankle Maitreya
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EarthStones | Doji Necklace – Love

[MANDALA] | STEKING_ears_ver3

**RealEvil Industries** | LUX – Nose piercing

*ARGRACE* | AZAMI – Platinum

*Mon Cheri* | “Falsies” Eyelashes

-Glam Affair- | Prezioso Lipstick 23

Madrid Solo | Lip Designs- Bubble Gloss Lips- Gloss Only

-Glam Affair- | Yolandi skin – Europa

IKON | Hope Eyes – Fjord

Visit http://chasingcatalina.blogspot.com/2015/11/the-live-interview-with-miss-virtual.html for original post date.

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